FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON BANGOR AIRPORT
308 Godfrey Blvd. · Bangor, ME 04401 · United States · Phone:
207-947-6721
· Central Reservations: 866-716-8133
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Canadian Thanksgiving is on the Way! Plan to Shop til you Drop!

Submitted by Four Points Bangor Team on Oct 07, 2013 - 8:00am
Posted in Holidays|Shopping|Things to do in Bangor

Doesn't it always seem like Canadian Thanksgiving seems to come out of nowhere, sometimes even before the leaves start changing color? Since Canadian Thanksgiving is always on a Monday, this 3-day weekend is a favorite time for large numbers of Canadians to come to the U.S. to visit friends or spend time checking out beautiful fall foliage and seasonal events. Those looking for hotels in Bangor Maine should look no further than Four Points Bangor Airport. Not only does Maine offer unbelievable sights, but also a wonderful, relaxing atmosphere and fun activities the whole family can enjoy. So come on down, northern neighbors! There are plenty of things to do in Bangor!

Crossbordershopping2

See Stars at the Acadia Night Sky Festival!

Submitted by Four Points Bangor Team on Sep 30, 2013 - 2:46pm
Posted in Local Events|Things To Do

To us, fall is a time of transition. The excitement of seeing that first hint of color in the leaves or feeling the temperature drop is palpable at Four Points Bangor

We watch in wonder as Maine's 57 species of trees begin preparing for the long winter ahead. The trees refuse to slip quietly into hibernation and instead, nature marches out, parading a display of bright oranges, yellows, purples, scarlet reds and rich browns.

Bring on Autumn!

Submitted by Four Points Bangor Team on Sep 17, 2013 - 10:43am
Posted in Weather|Things To Do|Outdoor Activities|Autumn

While some are mourning the end of summer, we here at our Bangor Hotel are happily pulling on our sweaters and jeans! Autumn in Maine is one of the most beautiful natural sights around! The crisp autumn nights coupled with warm sunny days produce Maine’s famously gorgeous fall foliage colors. As we walk through the scenic mountain passes to quiet lakeside villages, we are often amazed at the brilliant masterpieces Mother Nature creates for us....

Enjoy a Weekend of Fun in Downtown Bangor!

Submitted by Four Points Bangor Team on Jul 26, 2013 - 4:12pm
Posted in Things To Do|Downtown Bangor

Don’t let this damp weather get you down! There are so many things to do in Bangor to fill your weekend! Make your way to Downtown Bangor and enjoy cool sounds, browse antique shops or pop into a pub for a local brew like Shipyard – our Best Brew selection.

Maine's Benedict Arnold Connection

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Sep 21, 2012 - 1:07pm
Posted in Things To Do

As a student of history with a special interest in Colonial history, I learned a fascinating bit of information this week listening to the George Hale and Ric Tyler Show while driving to work:

Maine has a Benedict Arnold connection!

Colburn House

That connection is the Reuben Colburn house (pictured above) in Pittston, which has some special events planned this weekend.  Here's a bit of the story:

"Built in 1765 by Reuben Colburn, this house in Pittston still stands as testimony to the people who first settled the Kennebec River region of Maine and blazed a path for others to follow.

Near his home, Colburn built a saw mill, brickyard, boat yard, and gristmill, in order to provide settlers with needed materials.

Ten years after he began building his home, Colburn met with George Washington and was instrumental in planning a Continental Army expedition through the Maine wilderness to seize the heavily fortified city of Quebec from the British Army.

Led by Colonel Benedict Arnold, a force of 1,100 soldiers began what is now called "Arnold's March" or the "Arnold Expedition" here on Colburn's property. Among those who accompanied Arnold were Aaron Burr, Henry Dearborn, Daniel Morgan, and men from Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

Disembarking from the ten ships that carried them from Massachusetts, Arnold's men transferred their food, supplies, and equipment to 220 batteaux waiting for them here. Colburn assembled a team of craftsmen to build these boats in just two weeks despite a lack of nails and seasoned lumber. In addition, Colburn provided Arnold with food, supplies, maps, and reports from guides he had sent up the river to scout ahead.

In addition to financing the construction of the boats and gathering of supplies, Colburn paid a group of local men to accompany the army and make any needed repairs along the way. With the exception of the 20 lbs. that General Washington paid him in advance, Colburn was never reimbursed for his expenses.

Despite his efforts at helping the colonies win independence from Great Britain, the American government never repaid Colburn for financing the Arnold Expedition, and the debt brought him to financial ruin. Through his many industries and hard work, Colburn rebuilt his family's wealth and his descendants remained in this house for more than 100 years."

Pittston is a little over an hour's drive from our Bangor hotel.  It would make a great day trip.  It will be open for tours on Satuday and Sunday.  Also on Sunday at 2 PM, author and historian Arthur Lefkowitz, will give a lecture on "What happened to the men of the expedition after Quebec."  He is the author of the book Benedict Arnold's Army: The 1775 American Invasion of Canada During the Revolutionary War.

Grab the kids and learn more about this interesting piece of history.  For more information:

Colburn House State Historic Site

Is It A Roundabout or a Rotary?

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Sep 17, 2012 - 3:14pm
Posted in Hotel

If you've been to our Bangor hotel lately you couldn't help but notice the changes they were making to the intersections of Godfrey Boulevard and Maine Avenue.

But, is it a roundabout or a rotary?

"The first rotary in the United States used for traffic control was Columbus Circle in New York, which opened in 1905. Rotaries are circular or elliptical islands, with a central island 300 to 600 feet wide. They are designed for vehicles to enter, merge, circulate, change lanes and exit at relatively high speeds -- 30 to 50 mph.

Early in the 20th century, when vehicle speeds were slower, drivers were patient and traffic volumes were low, rotaries were an efficient and relatively safe form of traffic control. As traffic volumes and vehicle speeds increased, congestion and crashes increased significantly.

A study done by Per Gardner at the University of Maine found that rotaries have 3.5 to 6.5 times more crashes than roundabouts. Because of increasing congestion, roads were cut through the center of many rotaries and signalization was added.

Then came roundabouts. The first roundabout in America was built in 1992 at an intersection in Gainesville. Although rotaries and roundabouts use a circular design, they operate very differently. Rotaries are very large and are designed for high-speed vehicle operation. Roundabouts are designed as small as possible, 16 to 180 feet wide, and operate at 15 mph to 25 mph.

The design of roundabouts forces drivers to slow as they approach them, then limits drivers' circulating and exit speed. It is difficult to pass through a well-designed roundabout above these design speeds.

In addition to slow vehicle speeds, modern roundabouts require drivers to slow and select gaps in the circulating traffic before entering the roundabout at low speed."

So, is it a roundabout or a rotary? It's a roundabout. 

Is there any special driving instructions you need when driving a roundabout?  I'm glad you asked!

"As you approach a roundabout, you will see a yellow "roundabout ahead" sign with an advisory speed limit for the roundabout. 

Slow down as you approach the roundabout, and watch for pedestrians in the crosswalk. 

Continue toward the roundabout and look to your left as you near the yield sign and dashed yield line at the entrance to the roundabout. Yield to traffic already in the roundabout. 

Once you see a gap in traffic, enter the circle and proceed to your exit. If there is no traffic in the roundabout, you may enter without yielding. 

Look for pedestrians and use your turn signal before you exit, and make sure to stay in your lane as you navigate the roundabout."


Do you like the new roundabout?

Open Lighthouse Day is Saturday

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Sep 14, 2012 - 1:34pm
Posted in Things To Do

The U.S. Coast Guard, the State of Maine and the American Lighthouse Foundation are once again holding the fourth annual Maine Open Lighthouse Day on Saturday, October 15.

Last year, hundreds of people visited lighthouses along the Maine coast in the largest effort of its kind in the United States.

The partnership of the Coast Guard, State of Maine and American Lighthouse Foundation is to increase awareness of Maine’s maritime heritage and the rich history of its lighthouses and lighthouse keepers.

Many are within an easy drive from our Bangor hotel.

Participating Lighthouses

(all will be open 9:00 am to 3:00 pm unless otherwise noted)

Brown's Head Lighthouse – Vinalhaven Island (offshore). Historic buildings open: Light tower only. The tower contains a Fresnel lens, a remarkable, 19th-century invention that allows lights to project their beams far out to sea.

Burnt Coat Harbor Lighthouse – Swan’s Island (offshore). Historic buildings open: Light tower and keeper’s house.

Burnt Island Lighthouse – entrance to Boothbay Harbor (offshore). Historic buildings open: Light tower and keeper’s house (Living-history museum inside).

Curtis Island Lighthouse – entrance to Camden Harbor (offshore).  Historic buildings open: Light tower only. How to get there: Boat

Doubling Point Lighthouse – Arrowsic (land-based). Historic buildings open: Light tower only.

Dyce Head Lighthouse – Castine (land-based). Historic buildings open: Light tower only.

Fort Point Lighthouse - Cape Jellison near Stockton Springs (land-based).  Historic buildings open: Light tower (contains a Fresnel lens) and bell tower (exhibits inside). 

Grindle Point Lighthouse – Islesboro (offshore). Historic buildings open: Light tower and keeper’s house (museum inside).

Kennebec River Range Lights (two towers) – Arrowsic (land-based).  Historic buildings open: Front and Rear Range light towers only.

Little River Lighthouse – entrance to Cutler Harbor (offshore) 9 a.m. to noon. Live music at the site. Historic buildings open: Light tower, boathouse and keeper’s house (furnished for overnight stays). How to get there: Friends of Little River Lighthouse boats leave from Town of Cutler Boat Landing.

Marshall Point Lighthouse – Port Clyde (land-based). Historic buildings open: Light tower and keeper’s house (Museum inside)

 Monhegan Island Lighthouse – Monhegan Island (offshore) 11:00 am to 4:00 pm. Historic buildings open: Light tower and keeper’s house (museum inside).

Owls Head Lighthouse – Owls Head (land-based). Historic buildings open: Light tower only. Contains a Fresnel lens.

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse – Bristol (land-based). Historic buildings open: Light tower (contains a Fresnel lens) and keeper’s house (museum inside).

Portland Breakwater Lighthouse (Bug Light) – South Portland (land-based). Historic buildings open: Light tower only.

Portland Head Lighthouse – Cape Elizabeth (land-based). Historic buildings open: Light tower and keeper’s house (museum inside). Note: On Open Lighthouse Day, approximately 300 tickets will be made available to visitors on a first-come-first-served basis. A ticket will be required to climb the tower. You must be at least 48 inches tall to climb the tower. Visitors must be able to climb 85+ steps unassisted.

Rockland Breakwater Lighthouse – Rockland (land-based via a breakwater). Historic buildings open: Light tower and keeper’s house.

Seguin Island Lighthouse – Off Popham Beach (offshore). Historic buildings open: Light tower and keeper’s house (furnished for overnight member stays).

Spring Point Ledge Lighthouse – South Portland (land-based via a breakwater). Historic buildings open: Light tower.

West Quoddy Head Lighthouse – Lubec (land-based). Historic buildings open: Light tower (contains a Fresnel lens) and keeper’s house (museum inside).

Whitehead Lighthouse – Entrance to Penobscot Bay, Whitehead Island (offshore). Historic buildings open 11 AM - 3PM: Light tower, keeper's house, whistle house and schoolhouse. How to get there: Whitehead Light Station boat. Complementary transportation available from Sprucehead. Please call (207) 200-7957.

Wood Island Lighthouse – Biddeford Pool (offshore). Historic buildings open: Light tower and keeper’s house. How to get there: Friends of Wood Island Lighthouse boats (reservations required). For reservations, call (207) 200-4552, Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Other Lighthouse Attractions:

Maine Lighthouse Museum - Rockland

We Will Not Forget

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Sep 11, 2012 - 3:46pm
Posted in

Lovely Fall Decorations

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Sep 10, 2012 - 2:59pm
Posted in meetings

Our Banquet Captain, Gene, did an excellent job of beautifully decorating the Godfrey Room for a dinner this evening.

The Godfrey Room is perfect for a small dinner or meeting.  Give our Sales Office a call at 947-6721 to schedule your next event.

Cannons will be roaring across the Penobscot this weekend (and other things to see and do)

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Jul 27, 2012 - 12:22pm
Posted in Things To Do

Just 24 miles from our Bangor hotel, cannons will be roaring across the Penobscot this weekend.

It's Civil War Weekend at Fort Knox! The Civil War Weekend will include representatives from the 20th Maine, 3rd Maine, 29th Georgia and 6th Maine Battery. The event will feature skirmishes, cannon firings, living history demos, lectures, and camp life. A special battle is planned for Saturday, July 28th, 2 PM, a modified version of the "Battle of the Crater", featuring ground pyrotechnics. For more information:  http://fortknox.maineguide.com/

And lest we forget the women, only 3 miles from our Bangor hotel, at the Bangor Museum & History Center, check out their exhibit Women in War 1861-1865.

For more information:  http://www.bangormuseum.org/

If history isn't your thing, the Bangor State Fair opens this weekend.

Our fair is over 150 years old and one of the largest in the nation.  It is not to be missed.  It features agricultural exhibits, carnival attractions, live performances and the lobster roll eating contest.

Because I grew up on a farm, the agricultral exhibits are always fun.

And of course, you can't miss the food and rides!

For more information: http://www.bangorstatefair.com/

What are your plans for this weekend?  We would love for you to share your stories and pictures.

Associate Lunch and Associate of the 2nd Quarter

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Jul 26, 2012 - 12:54pm
Posted in Associate Appreciation

Every quarter at our Bangor hotel we have an all associate lunch to thank everyone for their efforts and hard work and to announce which employee was voted as the Associate of the Quarter.  Godfrey's always supplies something delicious to eat and each manager brings a dish to share.  Today we had an outdoor picnic and even though it was overcast everyone had a great time!

We are very proud to announce our Associate for the 2nd Quarter of 2012:

Nick Squillante, Godfrey's Grille Bartender Extraordinaire (and his dog, Bo)

Clouds Over Bangor

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Jul 25, 2012 - 10:31am
Posted in Weather

It was a dreary day yesterday, in Bangor,  very dark and raining off an on.  Then in the late afternoon it really poured.  On the way home from work, the sun had come out and the sky was full of beautiful clouds.

Independence Day 2012

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Jul 04, 2012 - 8:52pm
Posted in Holidays

As I hear the fireworks across the Penobscot River tonight, I am reminded of the words of President John Adams:

“I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty; it ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more.”

fireworks in Bangor, Maine

Those very words were the inspiration for a song in the movie "1776" and rendered this way:

"Commitment!

Through all the gloom, through all the gloom
I see the rays of ravishing light and glory!

I see fireworks! I see the pagaent and
Pomp and parade
I hear the bells ringing out
I hear the cannons roar
I see Americans - all Americans
Free forever more"

Wishing you all a Happy Fourth!

Happy Canada Day!

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Jun 30, 2012 - 6:45pm
Posted in Holidays|Guests

Here at our Bangor hotel, just a few hours from Canada, we are so thankful for the many guests we have that regularly visit us from the North.

May you have a great Canada Day! 

Guest Comments

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Jun 20, 2012 - 11:04am
Posted in Guests

Comments like this from our Bangor hotel guests make our day!

From our house to yours

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Jun 16, 2012 - 8:29am
Posted in Holidays

Happy Father's Day!

A father holds his children's hands for a little while
But he holds their hearts forever.


From all of us at our Bangor hotel, we wish you a very Happy Father's Day.

Maine Troop Greeters Pavilion

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Jun 16, 2012 - 8:24am
Posted in Maine Troop Greeters

We are very excited to have the Maine Troop Greeters Pavilion right next to our Bangor hotel.

Watch this video from WABI of the Ribbon Cutting.  Our General Manager, Vivian Cammack, helped cut the ribbon.

The Long Winter

Submitted by Valerie Cross on Feb 24, 2011 - 12:04pm
Posted in Bangor Hotel Specials & Packages

Growing up on a farm in Iowa and experiencing some fairly significant blizzards, you would think I would be used to winter. So when I listened to the forecast for Friday, my first thought was. "Will this winter never end? It is the Long Winter!"

Did you read the Little House on the Prairie books by Laura Ingalls Wilder? I don't mean the television series, but the actual books. Many times this winter her book, "The Long Winter" has crossed my mind. Granted, we are not on the plains of South Dakota in the winter of 1880-81. We do not have ravenous wolves prowling around our houses at night looking for a tasty morsel. We have plenty to eat. We don't have to twist straw together until our fingers bleed so we can heat our homes. That winter lasted for seven months!

This winter has reminded me of the winters when I was growing up. I have vivid memories of the winter of '65 (that would be 1965, and yes, I am dating myself). Back in Iowa the drifts were so high my sisters and I could climb them to the roof of the barn. It hasn't been quite that bad in in Bangor, but those plowed snow piles are getting pretty high.

So what do we do for the next month, or two? Hopefully our winter won't last as long as Laura's. They celebrated Christmas in May when the snow finally melted and the train was able to get through with supplies.

If you're lucky, you can break up the winter blues by flying to warmer climes. Allegiant Air flies directly from Bangor International Airport to St. Petersburg, Florida. Why not stay with us the night before your early flight? We have a great ParknFly package that covers your room and parking for up to 2 weeks.

Unable to travel? Come join us for a great meal in Godfrey's Grille. Godfrey's is Bangor's best kept secret! You don't usually think of a hotel restaurant when you go out for a meal. But the food is great and we have an extensive wine list to choose from. You can enjoy a drink before dinner in front of the fireplace, or maybe enjoy that after dinner coffee while gazing into the fire. The atmosphere is warm and inviting. 

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Four Points By Sheraton Bangor Airport

Enjoy easy access to Bangor International Airport via an enclosed skywalk, homestead style guest rooms, and more at Four Points by Sheraton Bangor Airport. Local boutique shops and Bangor’s historic sites are a short drive away. After a long day, savor local favorites at Godfrey’s Grille & Lounge.

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